How to Supercharge Amrit, The Ayurvedic Antioxidant | Maharishi Ayurveda Blog

How to Supercharge Amrit, The Ayurvedic Antioxidant
An Interview with Anand Shrivastava, Chairman of Maharishi Ayurveda Products. on

How to Supercharge Amrit, The Ayurvedic Antioxidant

It was the early 1980s, and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi was exploring ways to revive the ancient science of health, Ayurveda, which was unknown in the West at that time. He invited Vaidya B.D. Triguna, the preeminent Ayurvedic expert (Vaidya), to discuss how to ease stress, suffering, and ill-health in our modern age.

Vaidya Triguna explained that the age-old Ayurvedic texts describe a special class of elixirs, called Rasayanas, which are far more effective in creating and maintaining balance than other herbal formulas. For one thing, they work in multi-directions, rather than having only one effect. In other words, if one of the body’s systems needed to increase, the Rasayana would help with that. If another system or Dosha needed to decrease, balance would be restored there, too. This was achieved by strengthening the mind and body at their basis, Dr. Triguna explained, as then the body’s own self-repair mechanisms would address any imbalances.

Maharishi was captivated by this concept of Rasayana and charged Dr. Triguna and another legendary Vaidya, Bal Raj Maharishi, the leading authority on medicinal plants, to create a Rasayana that would make all other medicines unnecessary. Maharishi envisioned an elixir that would enable people to sustain a vibrant state of health and wholeness, rather than addressing any specific disease.

What happened next is the stuff of legends. When the two illustrious Vaidyas completed their formulations, Maharishi invited them to his meeting room to present the results. Anand Shrivastava, the chairman of Maharishi Ayurveda based in India, tells what happened next.

Q: You were in the room when it happened, when the renowned Vaidyas met with Maharishi to explain the benefits of their respective Rasayanas. What did they say?
Anand: Vaidya Triguna presented a silver bowl filled with a dark colored paste. Balraj Maharishi brought pills in a decorative box.

Vaidya Triguna spoke first. “This Ayurvedic Rasayana helps primarily with digestion, because good digestion is the basis of health,” he said.

Balraj Maharishi, normally a quiet and reserved man, suddenly became quite animated. He said, “We have to address the basis of digestion, which is a life without stress. These Rasayana tablets contain ashwagandha and other herbs to reduce stress, improving the very basis of digestion at its root.”

Triguna next explained that his paste formula would also promote heart functioning. Balraj Maharishi said, “The heart is not just a pumping machine, it also has a very important function that is emotion. These tablets will strengthen both the emotional and physical aspects of the heart.”

Later Triguna said that the paste he created would also promote brain functioning. In reply Balraj Maharishi said that the integration between mind and body is also important, and explained how his tablets would help connect mental and physical functions.

And so, it went, the two brilliant minds debating like the Ayurvedic rishis of old.

Q: So, what happened next—which one was chosen?
Anand: None of the Ayurvedic experts, modern doctors and scientists present there could determine which one was better, so Maharishi said both, paste and tablets will complement each other and named them both together Amrit Kalash. He told the story of the original Amrit Kalash, emerged to alleviate the suffering at a similar time as this one. Vaidya Triguna’s paste became Amrit Kalash Nectar, and Vaidya Balraj Maharishi’s tablets became Amrit Kalash Ambrosia. For best results, we recommend that you take them together.

Q: What is the primary benefit of this two-part Amrit Kalash Rasayana?
Anand: Just as the two Vaidyas explained, the Amrit Nectar paste and Amrit Ambrosia tablets together restore balance on every level: mind, body, emotions, and ultimately consciousness itself. It is the ultimate Rasayana that can bring balance to the entire mind-body system. And even though it does not address a specific disease, it has been found to strengthen the whole mind-body system and fortify its response to even the most aggressive of health problems.

Q: I understand there is extensive research on Amrit Kalash. Can you give us a quick summary?
Anand: There are about 100 Scientific researchers conducted to study effects of Amrit on different aspects of stressful situations at renowned medical intuitions and universities mostly in the US and clinical trials in India and published in pear reviewed journals. The first research was done by the Japanese scientist, Yuki Niwa, one of the top researchers on the effects of free radicals, the reactive oxygen atoms that cause oxidative stress and damage the body’s cells, systems, and even the DNA. Free radicals are associated with cancer, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and many other diseases.

Free radicals in the body are increased by stress and neutralized by antioxidants. Dr. Niwa concluded in his research that Amrit Kalash is the most effective full-spectrum antioxidant available. And in further research by Dr. Hari Sharma at Ohio State University, it was found that Amrit Kalash could help in increasing the production of one of the body’s natural anti-oxidants—the group of enzymes called super oxide dismutase (SOD)—from 110% capacity to 214% to protect the system during intense stressful situations.

Perhaps some of the most astonishing research were done on cancer tumors in vitro, showing that they actually shrank. Other clinical studies showed that the toxicity and side effects of chemotherapy were dramatically reduced without interfering with the efficacy of the treatment. Other studies show that Amrit could help reduce atherosclerosis, helped mitigate angina pectoris pain, and helped bring balance to the heart and circulatory system. It also was shown to improve immunity, neurophysiological functioning, and intelligence & mental clarity.

But Amrit is not a medicine for angina pectoris or any other illness. It is an elixir that helps normalize the mind-body system, bringing it into balance. All the researches point in the direction of establishing balance, which is the basis of health. It also has been found to support immunity, strengthen defense mechanism and promote self-repair mechanism.

Q: Was this research conducted on both formulas?
Anand: Yes, most of the research were done on both formulas together. And that is what we recommend for maximum benefits: to take both formulas together, as they complement each other to enhance immunity and create the effect of overall balance and wholeness.

Just as we saw in the debate between Vaidya Triguna and Vaidya Balraj Maharishi, Amrit helps not only the heart, but the brain and the digestion. It strengthens the immune system, the self-repair mechanisms, the mind-body communication system, the heart and circulatory system—all these are strengthened by Amrit. It protects the system from any kind of damage caused by any kind of stress including mental, physical, environmental from the inside, as well as from outside. It promotes the body’s systems to function normally, without strain in optimum balance.

Q: What is the difference between them?
Anand: While both address the mind-body system, there are subtle differences, as we saw highlighted in the wonderful debate between the two illustrious Vaidyas. In general, Amrit Ambrosia tablets target the mind, brain and nervous system—helping to improve clarity and focus and reducing mental stress.

Amrit Nectar paste improves digestion and immunity, targets free radicals, purifies toxins, and strengthens the heart, brain, and circulatory systems. In fact, Amrit Ambrosia and Amrit Nectar both work complimentary to each other at the same time both having very strong Rasayana quality work in the direction of balancing the system individually as well. Although for maximum benefit it is recommended that both should be taken but even one of them will be providing fairly good support to the system.

Q: I understand there are 42 ingredients in the Amrit Kalash Nectar formula also there are some very precise steps involved in the production.
Anand: All the 42 ingredients work in optimum synergy and from amongst very important herbs of Ayurveda, collected from different regions of India. There are 250 precise steps involved in the production starting from visual inspection of herbs in the formula to instrumental tests for potency and for contamination, such as heavy metals, pesticides, and microorganisms. Each ingredient has to be tested separately and processed in a specific manner. Some need to be mixed together, others need to be kept separate until later on; some need to be slow-cooked, others need to be boiled. It’s an incredibly intricate process. A highly advanced synthesis of ancient Ayurvedic wisdom and most advanced food technology has been evolved to bring out the maximum benefits of Amrit Nectar along with long term stability without any chemical preservative. About 30 Kilos of raw herbs are used to produce one Kilo of Amrit Nectar which is a highly concentrated and potent formulation.

Special organic sugar is used to make Nectar palatable and also preserve it, and the herbs are cooked in organic ghee from grass fed cows. Both ghee and sugar also serve as carriers in Ayurveda—which means they bind with the herbal ingredients and “carry” the nutrition through the lipid (fat) membrane that surrounds the mitochondria. Antioxidants are carried to the heart of the cell and protect also the DNA. Amrit Kalash also contains polyphenols, beta-carotene and various other micro-nutrients essential for the system for optimum functioning and protection.

Q: What if someone can’t tolerate sugar or needs a low-fat diet and can’t eat ghee? I understand you have developed an alternative for them?
Anand: Yes. We have designed the same formula in tablet form without ghee, honey and sugar. While the original Amrit Nectar paste is always a better choice than the Amrit Nectar tablets, those people who cannot tolerate sugar, honey, and ghee can find good results with the tablet. In fact, research shows that the difference in efficacy is very small. Even in chemo-toxicity tests, we found similar results. Also, to clarify, although sugarcane is one of the ingredients listed in Amrit Nectar tablets, that refers to sugarcane root, which does not contain sugar. So, it is safe for those on a no-sugar diet. Amrit Kalash Nectar and Nectar tablets are both made from mostly organic ingredients—for the Nectar it’s 99% and for the Nectar tablet it’s 97%.

Q: Any closing thoughts?
Anand: Truly Amrit Kalash is a remarkable gift from Maharishi Ayurveda to the humanity, designed by the most respected Ayurvedic Vaidyas of our time, who each used their lifetime of experience to make the ancient Ayurvedic texts come alive. We are very optimistic that very soon it’s true value will be realized.


Research References

MAK – In vivo/In vitro studies

  1. Arnold, J. T., Wilkinson, B. P., Korytynski, E. A., & Steel, V. E. (1991). Chemopreventive activity of Maharishi Amrit Kalash and related agents in rat tracheal epithelial and human tumor cells. Proc Am Assoc Cancer Res, 32, 128–131.
  2. Arnold, J. T., Wilkinson, B. P., Sharma, S., & Steele, V. E. (1995). Evaluation of Chemopreventive Agents in Different Mechanistic Classes Using a Rat Tracheal Epithelial Cell Culture Transformation Assay. Cancer Research, 55(3), 537–543.
  3. Bondy, S. C., Hernandez, T. M., & Mattia, C. (1994). Antioxidant properties of two ayurvedic herbal preparations. Biochemical Archives, 10(1), 25–31.
  4. Cullen, W., Dulchavsky, S., Devasagayam, T., Venkataraman, B., & Dutta, S. (1997). Effect of Maharishi AK-4 on H2O2- induced oxidative stress in isolated rat hearts. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 56(3), 215–222.
  5. Dileepan, K. N., Patel, V., Sharma, H. M., & Stechschulte, D. J. (1990). Priming of splenic lymphocytes after ingestion of an ayurvedic herbal food supplement: Evidence for an immunomodulatory effect. Biochemical Archives, 6(3), 267–274.
  6. Dileepan, K. N., Varghese, S. T., Page, J. C., & Stechschulte, D. J. (1993). Enhanced lymphoproliferative response, macrophage mediated tumor cell killing and nitric oxide production after ingestion of an ayurvedic drug. Biochemical Archives, 9(4), 365–374.
  7. Dwivedi, C., Satter, B., & Sharma, H. (1988). Anticarcinogenic activity of an ayurvedic food supplement, Maharishi Amrit Kalash (AK). American Physiological Society/American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, A121-86.1.
  8. Dwivedi, C., Sharma, H. M., Dobrowski, S., & Engineer, F. N. (1991). Inhibitory effects of Maharishi-4 and Maharishi-5 on microsomal lipid peroxidation. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 39(3), 649–652. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-3057(91)90141-N
  9. Ferrari, F., Hsiao, W., Gerardi, G., Statuto, M., Mazzoleni, G., Marra, M., Sharma, H., & DiLorenzo D. (2000). Anti-Tumor Effects of Natural Products Maharishi Amrit Kalash-4 (MAK-4) and Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK-5) on Cell Transformation In Vitro and in Liver Carcinogenesis in Mice. 19th Annual Convention of Indian Association for Cancer Research and Symposium on Cancer Biology - Thrissur, India.
  10. Fields, J., Eftekhari, A., Hagen, J., Wichlinski, L., & Schneider, R. (1991). Anti-Aging and Oxygen Free Radical (OFR) Scavenging Effects of an Anti-Carcinogenic Natural Product, Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 5(6), A1735.
  11. Fields, J., Schneider, R., Wichlinski, L., & Hagen, J. (1990). Anti-Aging Effect of a Natural Product, Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK). International Union of Biochemists- Symposium No. 200, Satellite Meeting of the Oxygen Society, and the International Society for Free Radical Research, 09.
  12. Hanissian, S., Sharma, H., & Tejwani, G. (1988). Effect of Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) on brain opoid receptors (Abstract). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 2(4), 802.
  13. Hanna, A., Lee, J., Kauffman, E., Lott, J., & Sharma, H. (1995). Antiatherogenic Properties of the Herbal Mixture MAK-4 in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) Rabbits (Abstract). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 9(3), A141.
  14. Hanna, A., Sundaram, V., Falko, J., Stephens, R., & Sharma, H. (1996). Effect of Herbal Mixtures MAK-4 and MAK-5 on Susceptibility of Human LDL to Oxidation. Complementary Medicine International, 3(3), 28–36.
  15. Hauser, T., Walton, K., Glaser, J., & Wallace, R. (1987). Maharishi Amrit Kalash Inhibits Imipramine Binding. American Association of Ayur-Vedic Medicine.
  16. Inaba, R., Mirbod, S. M., & Sugiura, H. (2005). Effects of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 5 as an Ayurvedic herbal food supplement on immune functions in aged mice. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 5(8). https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-5-8
  17. Inaba, R., Sugiura, H., & Iwata, H. (1995). Immunomodulatory effects of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4 and 5 in mice. Japanese Journal of Hygiene, 50(4), 901–905. https://doi.org/10.1265/jjh.50.901
  18. Inaba, R., Sugiura, H., Iwata, H., & Tanaka, T. (1997). Dose-dependent activation of immune function in mice by ingestion of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 5. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, 2(1), 35–39. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02931227
  19. Inaba, R., Sugiura, H., Iwata, H., Mori, H., & Tanaka, T. (1996). Immunomodulation by Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4 in mice. Journal of Applied Nutrition, 48(1–2), 10–21.
  20. Lee, J. Y., Hanna, A. N., Lott, J. A., & Sharma, H. M. (1996). The antioxidant and antiatherogenic effects of MAK-4 in WHHL rabbits. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2(4), 463–478. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.1996.2.463
  21. Lee, J. Y., Lott, J. A., & Sharma, H. M. (1994). Biochemical changes induced by Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK-4) and MA-208 in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. In D. Armstrong (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 366, pp. 446–447). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-1833-4_48
  22. Lee, J. Y., Lott, J. A., Kauffman, E. M., & Sharma, H. M. (1997). Effect of the herbal mixture MAK-4 on organ functions in WHHL rabbits. Biochemical Archives, 13(4), 285–296.
  23. Lee, J. Y., Lott, J. A., Kauffman, E. M., & Sharma, H. M. (1997). Effect of the herbal mixture MAK-4 on organ functions in WHHL rabbits. Biochemical Archives, 13(4), 285–296.
  24. Mazzoleni, G. (2000). Anti-Tumor Effects of Natural Products Maharishi Amrit Kalash-4 (MAK-4) and Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK-5) on Cell Transformation In Vitro and in Liver Carcinogenesis in Mice. 19th Annual Convention of Indian Association for Cancer Research and Symposium on Cancer Biology - Thrissur, India, 52, 45–63.
  25. Niwa Y. (1991). Effect of Maharishi 4 and Maharishi 5 on inflammatory mediators -with special reference to their free radical scavenging effect. Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, 1(8), 23–27.
  26. Niwa Y. (1991). Effect of Maharishi 4 and Maharishi 5 on inflammatory mediators -with special reference to their free radical scavenging effect. Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, 1, 23–27.
  27. Patel, V. K., Wang, J., Shen, R. N., Sharma, H. M., & Brahmi, Z. (1992). Reduction of metastases of lewis lung carcinoma by an ayurvedic food supplement in mice. Nutrition Research, 12(4–5), 667–676. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0271-5317(05)80036-3
  28. Patel, V., Dileepan, K., Stechschulte, D., & Sharma, H. (1988). Enhancement of Lymphoproliferative Responses by Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) in Rats (Abstract). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 2(5), 4740.
  29. Patel, V., Wang, J., Shen, R., Bhrami, Z., & Sharma, H. (1990). Reduction of Mouse Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) by M-4 Rasayana in Mice (Abstract). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 4(3), A637;2151.
  30. Pathak, M., Srinivas, M., & Shariff, A. (2017). Prevention of Histological Changes after Colonic Diversion in Rats: An Experimental Study. Journal of Neonatal Surgery, 6(2), 26. https://doi.org/10.21699/jns.v6i2.511
  31. Pathak, M., Srinivas, M., & Shariff, A. (2017). Prevention of Histological Changes after Colonic Diversion in Rats: An Experimental Study. Journal of Neonatal Surgery, 6(2), 26. https://doi.org/10.21699/jns.v6i2.511
  32. Penza, M., Montani, C., Jeremic, M., Mazzoleni, G., Hsiao, W. L. W., Marra, M., Sharma, H., & Di Lorenzo, D. (2007). MAK-4 and -5 supplemented diet inhibits liver carcinogenesis in mice. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 7(19). https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-7-19
  33. Prasad, K. N., Edwards-Prasad, J., Kentroti, S., Brodie, C., & Vernadakis, A. (1992). Ayurvedic (science of life) agents induce differentiation in murine neuroblastoma cells in culture. Neuropharmacology, 31(6), 599–607. https://doi.org/10.1016/0028-3908(92)90193-S
  34. Prasad, M. L., Parry, P., & Chan, C. (1993). Ayurvedic agents produce differential effects on murine and human melanoma cells in vitro. Nutrition and Cancer, 20(1), 79–86. https://doi.org/10.1080/01635589309514273
  35. Rodella, L., Borsani, E., Rezzani, R., Lanzi, R., Lonati, C., & Bianchi, R. (2004). MAK-5 treatment enhances the nerve growth factor-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 93(2–3), 161–166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2003.12.033
  36. Sharma, H. M., Dwivedi, C., Satter, B. C., Gudehithlu, K. P., Abou-Issa, H., Malarkey, W., & Tejwani, G. A. (1990). Antineoplastic properties of Maharishi-4 against DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 35(4), 767–773. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-3057(90)90356-M
  37. Sharma, H. M., Feng, Y., & Panganamala, R. V. (1989). Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) prevents human platelet aggregation. Clinica e Terapia Cardiovascolare, 8(3), 227–230.
  38. Sharma, H. M., Hanna, A. N., Kauffman, E. M., & Newman, H. A. I. (1992). Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro by Maharishi Ayur-Veda herbal mixtures. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 43(4), 1175–1182. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-3057(92)90500-F
  39. Sharma, H. M., Hanna, A. N., Titterington, L. C., & Stephens, R. E. (1994). Effect of MAK-4 and MAK-5 on endothelial cell and soyabean lipoxygenase- induced LDL oxidation. In D. Armstrong (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 366, pp. 441–443). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-1833-4_46
  40. Sharma, H. M., Krieger, J., & Dwivedi, C. (1990). Antineoplastic properties of dietary maharishi-4 and maharishi amrit kalash, ayurvedic food supplements. European Journal of Pharmacology, 183(2), 193. https://doi.org/10.1016/0014-2999(90)93027-N
  41. Sharma, H. M., Lee, J. Y., Kauffman, E. M., & Hanna, A. N. (1996). In vivo effect of herbal mixture MAK-4 on antioxidant capacity of brain microsomes. Biochemical Archives, 12(3), 181–186.
  42. Sharma, H., Dwivedi, C., Satter, B., & Abou-Issa, H. (1991). Antineoplastic Properties of Maharishi Amrit Kalash, An Ayurvedic Food Supplement, Against, 7,12-Dimethylbenz (A) Anthracene-Induced Mammary Tumors in Rats. The Journal of Research and Education in Indian Medicine, 3, 1–8.
  43. Sharma, H., Guenther, J., Abu-Ghazaleh, A., & Dwivedi, C. (1994). Effects of Ayurvedic Food Supplement M-4 on Cisplatin-Induced Changes in Glutathione and Glutathione-S-Transferase Activity. In R. Rao, M. Deo, L. Sanghvi, & I. Mittra (Eds.), XVI International Cancer Congress: Vol. Abstract B (pp. 589-). Monduzzi Editore.
  44. Sharma, H., Hanissian, S., Rattan, A., Stern, S., & Tejwani, G. (1991). Effect of Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) on Opioid Receptors and Neuropeptides. The Journal of Research and Education in Indian Medicine, 10(1), 1–8.
  45. Sharma, H., Hanna, A., Titterington, L., Lubow, G., & Stephens, R. (1994). The Antioxidant Activity of Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK-4 and MAK-5), Estrogen and Vitamin C. Scientific Conference on Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Proliferation, American Heart Association.
  46. Sharma, H., Satter, B., & Dwivedi, C. (1988). Anticarcinogenic activity of an ayurvedic food supplement, M4. American Physiological Society/American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, A 121-86.2.
  47. Sugiura, H., Inaba, R., Iwata, H., Nishida, H., & Tanaka, T. (1998). Modifying effects of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4 and 5 on phagocytic and digestive functions of macrophages in male ICR mice. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, 3(1), 50–54. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02931239
  48. Sundaram, V., Hanna, A., Koneru, L., Lubow, G., Sharma, H., & Falko, J. (1995). The Effect of Oral Herbal Mixtures, Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) 4 and 5 on Lipoproteins and LDL Oxidation in Hyperlipidemic Patients (Abstract). Journal of Investigative Medicine, 43(3), 483A.
  49. Tomlinson Jr., P., & Wallace, R. (1991). Superoxide Scavenging of Two Natural Products, Maharishi -4 (M-4) and Maharishi 5 (M-5). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 5(5), A1284.
  50. Vohra, B. P. S., James, T. J., Sharma, S. P., Kansal, V. K., Chudhary, A., & Gupta, S. K. (2002). Dark neurons in the ageing cerebellum: Their mode of formation and effect of Maharishi Amrit Kalash. Biogerontology, 3(6), 347–354. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1021303415191
  51. Vohra, B. P. S., Sharma, S. P., & Kansal, V. K. (1999). Maharishi Amrit Kalash rejuvenates ageing central nervous system’s antioxidant defence system: An in vivo study. Pharmacological Research, 40(6), 497–502. https://doi.org/10.1006/phrs.1999.0540
  52. Vohra, B. P. S., Sharma, S. P., & Kansal, V. K. (2001). Maharishi Amrit Kalash, an ayurvedic medicinal preparation, enhances cholinergic enzymes in aged guinea pig brain. Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, 39(12), 1258–1262.
  53. Wankhade, V., & Khalekar, J. (2012). Effect of MAK-4, an Herbal Supplement on Some Biochemical Parameters of Serum in Mice. Asian Journal of Science and Applied Technology, 1(1), 9–12.

MAK – Human Observational and Clinical Trial Studies

  1. Blasdell, K., Sharma, H., Tomlinson, P., & Wallace, R. (1991). Subjective Survey, Blood Chemistry and Complete Blood Profile of Subjects Taking Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) (Abstract). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 5(5), A1317.
  2. Dogra, J., & Bhargava, A. (2000). Lipid Peroxide in Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD): Inhibition by Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK-4 and MAK-5) Herbal Mixtures (Abstract). Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 14(4), A121.
  3. Dogra, J., Grover, N., Kumar, P., & Aneja, N. (1994). Indigenous Free Radical Scavenger MAK 4 and 5 in Angina Pectoris. Is it only a Placebo? Journal of the Association of Physicians of India (JAPI), 42(6), 466–467.
  4. Gelderloos, P., Ahlstrom, H. H. B., Orme-Johnson, D. W., Robinson, D. K., Wallace, R. K., & Glaser, J. L. (1990). Influence of a Maharishi Ayur-Vedic herbal preparation on age-related visual discrimination. International Journal of Psychosomatics, 37(1–4), 25–29.
  5. Glaser, J., Robinson, D., & Wallace, R. (1991). Improvement in Seasonal Respiratory Allergy with Maharishi Amrit Kalash 5, an Ayurvedic Herbal Immunomodulator. Seventh Annual Conference on Scientific Proceedings of the American Association of Ayurvedic Medicine, Volume 7: 1; pp 6.
  6. Glaser, J., & Moriarty, T. (1991). Prospective Study of Health Improvements in Users of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 5. Seventh Annual Conference on Scientific Proceedings of the American Association of Ayurvedic Medicine, 4.
  7. Gurlee, P., Gustavson, J., Keely, M., Wronski-Bodier, C., & Glaser, J. (1991). Clinical effect of Maharishi Amrit Kalash 4 and 5 herbal preparations in the rehabilitation of late neurological deficits following head injury. Seventh Annual Conference on Scientific Proceedings of the American Association of Ayurvedic Medicine, Vol 7:1, pp 1.
  8. Hanna, A., Sundaram, V., Falko, J., Stephens, R., & Sharma, H. (1996). Effect of Herbal Mixtures MAK-4 and MAK-5 on Susceptibility of Human LDL to Oxidation. Complementary Medicine International, 3(3), 28–36.
  9. Misra, N., Sharma, H., Chaturvedi, A., Ramakant, Natu, S., Bogra, J., Srivastava, S., Devi, V., Kakkar, P., & Vishwanathan. (1994). Antioxidant Adjuvant Therapy Using a Natural Herbal Mixture MAK During Intensive Chemotherapy: Reduction in Toxicity- A Prospective Study of 62 Patients. XVI International Cancer Congress, Abs Book 1; pp 287–288.
  10. Samaiya, A., Srivastava, A., Taranikanti, V., Coshic, O. H., Parshad, R., Valthalure, S., Chumber, S., Bal, S., Chattopadhyaya, T. K., Saxena, M., & Kachroo, P. (1999). Reduction in Toxicity of Cancer Chemotherapy by Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK)- An Ayurvedic Herbal Compound. Annals of the National Academy of Medical Sciences, 35(2), 109–119.
  11. Saxena, A., Dixit, S., Aggarwal, S., Vuthaluru, S., Prashad, R., Bhushan, S., Tranikanti, V., Misra, M., & Srivastava, A. (2008). An Ayurvedic Herbal Compound to Reduce Toxicity to Cancer Chemotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Indian Journal of Medical and Paediatric Oncology, 29(2), 11–18.
  12. Sharma, H., Hanissian, S., Rattan, A., Stern, S., & Tejwani, G. (1991). Effect of Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK) on Opioid Receptors and Neuropeptides. The Journal of Research and Education in Indian Medicine, 10(1), 1–8.
  13. Sundaram, V., Hanna, A., Lubow, G., Falko, J., & Sharma, H. (1995). Increased Resistance of Human LDL to Oxidation in Hyperlipidemic Patients Supplemented with Oral Herbal Mixture MAK-4. Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, 9(3), A141.
  14. Sundaram, V., Hanna, A., Lubow, G., Koneru, L., Falko, J., & Sharma, H. (1997). Inhibition of Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation by Oral Herbal Mixtures Maharishi Amrit Kalash-4 and Maharishi Amrit Kalash -5 in Hyperlipidemic Patients. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 314(5), 303–310. https://doi.org/10.1097/00000441-199711000-00007
  15. Zanella, I., DiLorenzo, R., & DiLorenzo D. (2015). Effects of the Dietary Supplement MAK4 on Oxidative Stress Parameters: A “Three-Cases” Report. Open Access Library Journal, 2, e2150. https://doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1102150

MAK in Multimodal Treatments

  1. Fields, J., Walton, K., Schneider, R., Nidich, S., Pomerantz, R., Suchdev, P., Castillo-Richmond, A., Payne, K., Clark, E., & Rainforth, M. (2002). Effect of a Multimodality Natural Medicine Program on Carotid Atherosclerosis in Older Subjects: A Pilot Trial of Maharishi Vedic Medicine. American Journal of Cardiology, 89(8), 952–958. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0002-9149(02)02245-2
  2. Nader, T., Rothenberg, S., Averbach, R., Charles, B., Fields, J., & Schneider, R. (2014). Improvements in Chronic Diseases with a Comprehensive Natural Medicine Approach: A Review and Case Series. Behavioral Medicine, 26(1), 34–36. https://doi.org/10.1080/08964280009595751
  3. Sharma, H., Dillbeck, M., & Dillbeck, S. (1994). Implementation of the Transcendental Meditation Program and Maharishi Ayur-Veda to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse Among Juveniles at Risk. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 11(3–4), 429–457.

MAK Standardization, Biomolecule Estimation, and Reviews

  1. Chopra, K., Aggarwal, K., & Chopra, H. (1990). Free Radicals in Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis and Role of Herbal Antioxidant Amrit Kalash on the same. Indian Journal of Clinical Practice, 1.
  2. Kamath, C. R., & Shah, B. (2015). Quantitative estimation of catechin, quercetin AND ß-carotene from polyherbal formulation. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research.
  3. Kamath, C., & Shah, B. (2014). Phytochemical Screening and Standardization of Polyherbal Formulation: Maharishi Amrit Kalash 5. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 6(7), 96–98.
  4. Kamath, C., & Shah, B. (2016). Role of Ayurvedic Polyherbal Formulation Maharishi Amrit Kalash: A Review. World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 5(6), 472–485.

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